Glossary

Backfill Zone: The soil surrounding basement walls through which storm water may percolate into the foundation drain or weeping tile.
Backflow Valve: A valve that allows one-way flow of sewage out of the home while blocking sewage from flowing into the basement.
Check Valve: A valve that allows one-way flow of sewage.
Comprehensive Flood Proofing: The concept of all-out flood proofing such that all possible means are taken to prevent basement flooding.
Downspouts: Pipes connecting to the eavestroughs and discharging to the ground level, sometimes referred to as roof leaders.
Domestic Sewer: An underground sewer system designed to receive waste water and transport it from homes to the sewage treatment plant. This system is not intended to receive weeping tile water.
Efflorescence: Formation of white crystalline deposit on the face of concrete surfaces.
Footing: A concrete base upon which basement walls are placed and also weeping tile is placed against.
Foundation Drain: A special piping system that surrounds basement footing and is designed to receive water that has percolated down through the backfill zone.
Gate Valve: A manually operated valve that isolates basement plumbing. Closing a gate valve will also prevent sewer backup from entering floor drains.
Impervious Surface: A surface which does not allow water to pass through.
Percolating Water: Storm water that passes through the backfill zone and into the weeping tile (much like water passes through a coffee filter).
Prioritized Flood Proofing: A flood proofing concept where sources of flooding are first diagnosed and then a method of solving them is devised.
P-trap: A discharge pipe found in sump pits where water drains from the sump pit into the domestic sewer.
Sewer Backup: A condition which occurs when too much liquid is in the domestic sewer. The sewer flows into homes instead of out of homes.
Sewer Surcharge: A condition which occurs when too much liquid is in the domestic sewer.
Splash Pad: These are often concrete receptacles that receive water from downspouts. They help prevent erosion and move water away from the foundation.
Storm Sewer: The underground sewer system designed to receive storm water or rainwater that has become runoff. This system carries water away to storm channels or the North Saskatchewan River.
Storm Water: Rainwater that has reached the surface and has begun soaking into the ground or running off into the storm sewer.
Sump Pit: A small pit located in houses such that it receives discharge from weeping tile.
Sump Pump: A special pump designed for automatic operation. It pumps weeping tile water that accumulates in the sump pit. Most sump pumps are not intended to pump raw sewage.
Undisturbed Soil: Soil that has not been disrupted by human activities.
Weeping Tile: A special piping system that surrounds basement footing and is designed to receive water that has percolated down through the backfill zone.
 
 Answers From Introduction Page: ( a=6, b=2, c=1, d=3, e=5, f=4, g=7 )



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